THE HEART & SOUL OF OUR AREA IS REPRESENTED BY MANY OF OUR NON-PROFITS

CENTRAL OREGON NON-PROFITS LEAD THE WAY DURING TIME OF UNCERTAINTY

We Central Oregonians are a lucky bunch.

We’ve got incredible access to the outdoors, an abundance of world-class craft breweries, some of the best schools in the state, top-notch parks, and the coolest amphitheater in the Pacific Northwest.

But the heart and soul of our area is represented by Central Oregon’s multiple non-profits. It’s pretty amazing to look at the time, energy and money that volunteers across our region have donated for various causes. We’re fortunate here in the Old Mill District to have worked with an all-star lineup of organizations. Saving Grace, NeighborImpact, KIDS Center, the Deschutes County Historical Society, the High Desert Food & Farm Alliance, and Stroke Awareness Oregon, to name a few. 

This fall we’re excited to highlight the work of an old friend, the Upper Deschutes Watershed Council, and a new group doing some outstanding, Latino Outdoors’ Central Oregon chapter

 Thank you to everyone who volunteers their time to make Central Oregon a safer, more welcoming, more inclusive and kinder place.

BEND DESIGN WEEK 2020

JOIN A DIVERSE CAST OF CREATORS, DESIGNERS AND THINKERS ONLINE FOR THIS YEAR’S CONFERENCE

Come together for Bend Design Week, taking place online for 2020. Join our diverse group of creative thinkers, designers, and artists for meaningful talks, hands-on workshops, and lively discussions. Tune in from the comfort of your own device and become the change.

Bend Design 2020 will feature thought-provoking, motivating presentations with leading designers, artists, creative thinkers, and problem solvers. That much hasn’t changed. 

What’s different is the format. We’re excited to extend our reach and expand our community by moving online for COVID-19 safety. Though we’ll miss gathering with you all in person, we’re making the best choices we can to support the health and wellbeing of our community, volunteers, and production team.

2020 SPEAKER AND EVENT LINEUP

Shabazz Larkin

artist, author, priest

Find Your Art

Can art be a spiritual practice? By the way, what is art? What is good art? What is a spiritual practice? Will it help us find our purpose? Why do we keep obsessing over our purpose? Who are we? Are we supernatural beings? Is art supernatural? Does quantum physics have any answers? Is God a man-made design? Does that mean God is real, or not real? Am I flawed or are they flawed?  It certainly matters – but why? 

Laurie Haycock Makela

walker, talker, thinker

Debbie Millman

designer, author, educator

Design Matters with podcast host Debbie Millman and artist Laurie Haycock Makela

Join us for the Design Matters interview as podcast host Debbie Millman returns to Bend Design. This year Debbie interviews AIGA medalist Laurie Haycock Makela, a leading voice in transdisciplinary graphic design practice and education for more than three decades. Recently, Makela was one of six artists collaborating on the celebrated multisensory exhibition “Speechless: Different by Design” at the Dallas Art Museum.

Laurie Haycock Makela

walker, talker, thinker

Speechless: Different by Design

Described by Forbes as “a new exhibition that bucks the status quo…broadening the idea of visual communication,” the multisensory exhibition “Speechless: Different by Design” wowed visitors to the Dallas Art Museum. In her talk, Laurie Hayock Makela will discuss the exhibition itself, together with the book she designed for this extraordinary project, which focused on the senses, not language. Makela will also discuss other recent work, such as a poster designed in collaboration with April Greiman for the AIGA Get Out the Women’s Vote initiative.

Greg Hoffman
advisor, strategist, creative

Corey Martin
principal designer, artist

Drawing from Landscape

How can built spaces make us feel more connected to the landscape—and to each other? Global brand and design leader Greg Hoffman joins Corey Martin, principal at Hacker Architects, for creative conversation. The two will discuss Hacker’s award-winning approach to architecture in the Pacific Northwest, amply visible in iconic Central Oregon structures such as Lakeside at Black Butte Ranch, the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship building on Skyline in Bend, and the upcoming Grove at Northwest Crossing. All three spaces represent a unique relationship between the natural and built environments. Greg and Corey will also discuss their creative collaboration on the High Desert House right here in Bend, for which Greg and his family were Hacker’s clients.

Samuel Stubblefield

curious, thoughtful, artist

AWE

In complicated times, we often lose a sense of groundedness. Almost ironically, groundedness is exactly what is needed as we sift through oceans of information every day—information that tells us who we are as individuals and as a species. Awe-inspiring experiences clear the clutter and recalibrate our relationship to the universe, giving us a better perspective, making way for clarity of mind, and bringing about a more confident sense of purpose.

Jen Wick

designer, artist, educator

Precious Bugarin

creative director, designer, educator

You Belong Here: Imposter syndrome and creating a culture of belonging

Imposter syndrome is the feeling that you’re not good enough, undeserving of your success, or that people will discover that you’re a big fraud. Perhaps you feel you have to fake it until you make it. Maybe you feel unworthy of the position you’re in or afraid to move forward into a new one. In this workshop, Precious and Jen will lead you through conversations and creative exercises to explore imposter syndrome and its effects on your creative life. With new insight, you can deeply believe in your value and better advocate for yourself (and others!) at work and in life. We want you to unplug from the dominant culture narrative that you need to be perfect or be like anyone else in order to grow, learn, thrive and belong.

Justin Ahrens

creative, do gooder, cyclist

Seeing Different

We are all built to see the world differently. It’s one of our unique, innovative traits. We all say we want to be a part of changing the world, but how do we actually accomplish this? Can we actually make a difference? This presentation will give you thoughts, prompts, and examples of how you can use your gifts to See Different.

Sheima Hassanlou

connector, instigator, executive producer

Everything I Need to Know about Business I Learned at the Cocktail Bar

In today’s digitally focused society, where most of our attention is spent staring at a screen, sacred spaces like the cocktail bar allow for genuine human connection to take place, one on one. Even in times of great despair such as The Great Depression, the industries that stayed resilient were entertainment (film) and hospitality (bars).
 

Bluebook

Entertainment; music, light, textiles

Bluebook Performance in the Sonic Loom

Music, light, and textiles meet in an installation called the Sonic Loom. Join three-piece band Bluebook performing a set of “smouldering chamber pop” (The Denver Post) inside their large-scale textile and light installation. Through the loom, Bluebook will present a liminal, transformative space and offer their audience a unique audiovisual experience.


Human flow

Film

Over 65 million people around the world have been forced from their homes to escape famine, climate change, and war in the greatest human displacement since World War II. Human Flow, an epic film journey led by the internationally renowned artist Ai Weiwei, gives a powerful visual expression to this massive human migration. The documentary elucidates both the staggering scale of the refugee crisis and its profoundly personal human impact.

Americanville

Film

Hidden among the mountains north of Beijing, a replica of the Wyoming town of Jackson Hole promises to deliver the American Dream to its several thousand Chinese residents. In Americaville, Annie Liu escapes China’s increasingly uninhabitable capital city to pursue happiness, freedom, romance, and spiritual fulfillment in Jackson Hole— only to find the American idyll harder to attain than what was promised.

Photo Credit: Amanda Long

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OUTSIDE EXPERIENCES FOR ALL

LATINO OUTDOORS AIMS TO CONNECT FAMILIES AND KIDS WITH NATURE

Zavier Borja’s mission right now is pretty straightforward.

Get more Latino families outside and outdoors.

“In Bend, there’s a little bit of this elitist narrative that if you’re not summing South Sister or biking 20-plus miles, you’re not really going outdoors,” says Borja, the program coordinator for Latino Outdoors’ Central Oregon branch. “Our job is to shift that narrative. Not a lot of people resonate with those kinds of activities and that’s OK.”

A national non-profit dedicated to inspiring connecting and engaging Latino communities in the outdoors, Latino Outdoors strives to embrace cultura y familia as part of the outdoor narrative, ensuring Latino history, heritage, and leadership are valued and represented.

“We encourage people to get outdoors and have a picnic,” Borja says. “Walk a mile. There’s a lot of positive benefits to the outdoors and we’re learning that even more so now. Mental health is a huge issue right now, especially for folks of color and in the Latinx community. Things like heart disease and diabetes, getting outside can reduce the risk of those diseases drastically.”

Founded on Earth Day in 2019, Latino Outdoors’ Central Oregon branch hosts monthly outings throughout the region. (The gatherings have temporarily been on hold because of COVID-19 and Baja has focused on being a resource hub for the Latinx community.) The group organizes everything from comfortable walks around Juniper Hill Park in Madras to introductory snowshoe classes at Shevlin Park in Bend and everything in between.

“We want to expose families to what’s around here,” Borja says. “We’ll go to Shevlin Park, for example, and do a 2-mile loop and after have tamales and do a raffle.”

The goal of Latino Outdoors across the country and in Central Oregon is to provide a world where all Latino communities enjoy nature as a safe, inclusive, and welcoming place. 

“There’s a lot of people in the Latinx community that one, don’t feel comfortable in the outdoors and two, don’t know what’s available,” Borja adds. “We’re bridging that gap.”

For more information on Latino Outdoors Central Oregon, check out their Facebook page.

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READY TO ROCK IN 2021

MULTIPLE CONCERTS ALREADY BOOKED AT THE LES SCHWAB AMPHITHEATER FOR NEXT SUMMER

Summer 2021 can’t get here soon enough.

After a year with no concerts, the Les Schwab Amphitheater is ready to rock and roll like never before next year. Five shows have already been booked and the venue is looking to host a record number of shows in 2021.

Just as exciting, look for a whole host of new bands and artists to grace the LSA stage, thanks to various improvements and upgrades throughout the Amphitheater. 

Here’s the current list of shows booked for 2021:

Rebelution with Steel Pulse, The Green, Keznamdi, and DJ Mackle
Aug. 21, 2021
General Admission $37.50. Service fees not included.

Seventeen years into an effervescent career, California reggae band and touring juggernaut Rebelution remains abundantly creative. Its members are as focused and committed as they are easygoing and laid-back. “Free Rein”, the band’s sixth studio album, while still rooted in the Jamaican inspiration that Rebelution’s songs and sounds have always paid homage to, takes experimental leaps and new adventures too, welcoming old fans and new audiences alike. Ever expanding, the Rebelution phenomenon continues to spread good vibes on tour, and in the studio.

Joining Rebelution in Bend next year are U.K. reggae legends Steel Pulse who have been pioneers in the genre for more than four decades. The Green, Keznamdi and DJ Mackle round out this stellar end-of-the-summer reggae lineup.

Primus – A Tribute To Kings
With special guest Battles
Wednesday, Aug. 18, 20121
General Admission $50.50 in advance, $56 day of the show. Service fees not included.

Primus will pay homage to prog-rock legends Rush next summer with A Tribute to Kings, a cross-country tour that will feature the Bay Area trio playing Rush’s classic 1977 album, “A Farewell to Kings,” in its entirety, in addition to their own music.

“A little over one year ago, Ler Lalonde and I started kicking the idea around of Primus performing a series of shows featuring an iconic Rush album from our youth,” Primus bandleader Les Claypool said. “Being that ‘A Farewell to Kings’ was the first Rush record I ever heard, and that it contains my all-time favorite Rush tune, ‘Cygnus X1,”’ the choice narrowed quickly.”

“The ‘Tribute to Kings’ tour will be just as it is implied,” Claypool added, “A respectful and loving tribute to three spectacular musicians, songwriters, legends and friends.”

Battles is set to open the show.

Luke Bryan with Morgan Wallen and Runaway June
Thursday, Sept. 21, 2021 and Friday, Oct.1, 2021
General admission $99.75, service fees not included.

Country superstar Luke Bryan heads to Bend for two nights as part of his Proud to Be Right Here 2021 Tour. 

As a four-time Entertainer of the Year for the Country Music Association (twice) and the Academy of Country Music, (twice) Bryan has achieved a rare place in the business, garnering the admiration of both his peers and the public. The industry voters for the Nashville-based CMA recognized him as one of the music industry’s few talents capable of filling a stadium on a regular basis. The fans, who pick the California-based ACM’s Entertainer, view him as a talented, good-natured guy who – when they see him at those stadium dates – is still one of them.

Bryan rolls into Bend having recently released his seventh studio album, “Born Here, Live Here, Die Here,” in 2020.

Dave Matthews Band
Wednesday, Sept. 8, 2021
General admission $115, service fees not included.

Dave Matthews Band heads to Bend next September – the Les Schwab Amphitheater is home to the band’s only Oregon show in 2021 – as part of its 35-date summer tour. The jam band favorites released their latest studio album in 2018, “Come Tomorrow,” their seventh album to debut No. 1 on Billboard’s album chart, an industry record.

The socially conscious rockers are partnering with The Dreaming Tree Wines and DocuSign this tour in an effort to plant one million trees. Concertgoers can contribute an optional donation of $2 per ticket to go toward The Nature Conservancy’s Plant a Billion Trees campaign, whose goal is to plant a billion trees around the world by 2025. Trees will be planted across the globe in the U.S., Mexico, Brazil, Colombia, China, and Africa.  

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TWINS WORKING TOGETHER WITH DISTANCE

FIBER ARTWORK BECOMES THE FABRIC OF THEIR CONNECTION AT LUBBESMEYER STUDIO & GALLERY

Artists (and identical twins) Lori and Lisa Lubbesmeyer have shared a studio and worked as collaborative artists since 1999. This means they both work on the same piece, but without a specific plan on the composition, feel, or even timeline for the final product. Lisa and Lori alternate turns working on the piece, typically up to fifteen or twenty times. 

Collaborating at a distance

They closed their studio for several weeks in the spring and took time to reconfigure their space to follow COVID-19 safety protocols. During the time that their studio was closed, they would each take a week to be in the studio working alone, while the other worked from home. They continued this pattern until they had a better understanding of how the virus was being spread, and how they could safely work together again. What resulted from their working independently was a development of work using multimedia, and an interesting by-product of having to collaborate while apart from one another. 

“We were grateful to notice the fiber ‘paintings’ and multimedia work we were creating through our collaboration were taking on an even greater meaning in our relationship – they literally became the fabric of our connection,” says Lori.

“Now, even more, we find ourselves savoring the meditative quality of the visual conversation each of our pieces depict,” agrees Lisa.

A chance to tackle the larger projects

With shows and exhibits canceled or postponed, the studio’s calendar has opened. They found, without the imposed deadlines, they had the chance to dig into work and projects that they’d imagined for years. 

The Lubbesmeyers’ art is largely known for depictions of landscapes, which is a subject they’re grateful to focus on during this unsettled time, as it continues to soothe and center them. However, some of their latest pieces have a narrative reflecting community and connection. In some of these new works, they’re also employing additional media to create mixed media assemblages. 

In addition to their fiber art, the twins are utilizing more traditional fine art media, including paint, pastel, chalk, paper, printmaking and of course, fabrics and stitching. 

“It’s satisfying to be at a point in our career where we have the ability to experiment with and implement the tools we used decades ago when we studied fine art. Additionally, the expansion and use of additional media offers us a nimble and dynamic way to react to our life experiences, which will offer the art collector a range of pieces to choose from,” says Lisa.

To learn more about the Lubbesmeyer Studio & Gallery , visit their open studio on Fridays, or schedule an appointment to view their work.  www.lubbesmeyer.com / 541.706.0761

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TICKET MILL: SUNDRIES, SOUVENIRS & SNACKS

NEW RETAIL SHOP IN THE OLD MILL DISTRICT SELLS CONCERT TICKETS, GIFT CARDS, BEND GEAR & MORE

The Ticket Mill is all grown up.

After operating for years out the little red shed next to Anthony’s, the Ticket Mill is now a full-blown retail shop in the Old Mill District, located across the street from its original location, between Tumalo Art. Co. and Lush.

Les Schwab Amphitheater concert tickets and Old Mill District gift cards are still available for in-person purchases at the Ticket Mill. But now snacks, grab-and-go lunches, and local craft beer, wine and cider are all available at in what’s become the Old Mill District’s own boutique corner shop.

“We want to be an all-inclusive place,” says Ticket Mill general manager Gabby Ochoa. “We’re not just a place for employees in the District, but for local people and tourists.”

The Ticket Mill also carries a host of Bend and Pacific Northwest-inspired apparel – T-shirts, hats, hoodies– as well as a fantastic selection of unique local products like hazelnuts from Holm Made Toffee Co., Broken Top Candle Co. candles, and Bend-branded Silipints. You can also find Les Schwab Amphitheater and Bend Brewfest merchandise at the Ticket Mill.

Rounding out the inventory in the Ticket Mill is a selection of everyday necessities, including cold and allegory medicine, personal hygiene products, diapers, dog treats, sunblock, Band-Aides, and the like. And for area businesses, the Ticket Mill sells a handful of office supplies, including printing paper, stables, and tape.

The Ticket Mill also serves as the primary location for Old Mill District gift cards. Valid at any of the Old Mill District’s restaurants, shops, art galleries, fitness studios and even Regal Cinema, OMD gift cards are available in denominations from $10 to $500. And yes, the lucky recipient of your gift card can use it on some of the great new products in the Ticket Mill.

“We’ve literally got something for everybody,” Ochoa says. “If you don’t like clothes, we’ve got candles and soaps and Silipints. … We just really feel like this is a super awesome addition to the Old Mill District.”

Ticket Mill: Sundries, Souvenirs & Snacks

– Open daily, Noon-5:30 p.m.

– 450 SW Powerhouse Drive, Suite 408 (across from The Buckle & between Tumalo Art Co. and Lush)

– 541-318-5457

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PROTECTING CENTRAL OREGON’S RIVERS

THE UPPER DESCHUTES WATERSHED COUNCIL RESTORES AND PROTECTS THE 2 MILLION-ACRE DESCHUTES RIVER WATERSHED

We’ve all got our favorite spots of river here in Central Oregon.

That gorgeous meandering stretch of the Fall River before the hatchery.  

The turns and bends that create the multiple waterfalls on Tumalo Creek above Tumalo Falls. 

And the section of the Deschutes between Benham Falls and Dillon Falls that’s perfect for floating, rafting and fishing, just to name a few.

They’re all stunning examples of rivers and streams that the Upper Deschutes Watershed Council (UDWC) is committed to protecting and restoring. Since 1996, the UDWC has helped unite landowners, ranchers, environmental groups, local and regional government agencies and passionate river users to keep waterways in the Upper Deschutes River watershed healthy and vibrant. 

Even with the recent pandemic, the UDWC has remained active in protecting and restoring the Upper Deschutes. This spring, while schools were closed, the organization created 14 videos and lessons for students, parents and teachers. In July the UDWC removed 47 bags of garbage and weeds at seven sites during its annual Deschutes River Cleanup event. And right now, the non-profit is in the process of removing the last dam and fish passage barrier in Whychus Creek.

(Here’s a fantastic short documentary highlighting the amount of collaboration it took to remove another dam on the Whychus in 2015)

Now through Oct. 1, the UDWC has a tremendous opportunity for its education program. A longtime UDWC supporter has made a generous offer to match all donations up to $30,000, toward the organization’s youth education program. Yes, that means your donation to the UDWC’s educational programs will be DOUBLED from now through September!

DONATE NOW!

The UDWC engages approximately 3,000 students each year from local schools, getting them out to our local rivers and creeks to learn what it means to have a healthy river and watershed. This past spring when schools closed, the UDWC converted its programs online, which in turn were utilized by teachers and parents throughout Central Oregon. This fall the UDWC will offer a combination of in-person, outdoor learning opportunities for small groups of children and more online lessons and videos.

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PEDAL POWER

EXPERIENCE BEND BY BIKE WITH HELP FROM WHEEL FUN RENTALS

Bend’s known as a world-class mountain bike town, and for good reason. Our little outdoor mecca boasts nearly 500 miles of bike trails. 

Just as fun, though – especially for families – is exploring Bend and the Old Mill District via pedal power.

Wheel Fun Rentals, located on the north end of the Old Mill District near Café Yumm!, Flatbread Neapolitan Pizzeria and Pastini, rents bikes that make for the perfect river trail adventure. Check out one of Wheel Fun’s four-wheel surreys that seat anywhere between three and nine adults, allowing your entire family to explore Bend together.

Have some teens looking for something a little sleeker? Check out Wheel Fun’s Deuce Coup or Chopper, three-wheel pedal bikes that might just be the coolest way to cruise through town.

Wheel Fun also offers standard multi-speed bikes, cruisers, fat bikes, tag-a-longs, tandems, strollers and bike trailers. Rentals are available by the hour, for half and full days, and for multi-day use. 

With Wheel Fun’s stable of bikes, families can make their way along the Deschutes River Trail in and around Bend. Starting in the Old Mill District, riders have easy access to McKay Park, Drake Park, Mirror Pond, First St. Rapids Park, Sawyer Park, and even Archie Briggs Canyon, which offers stunning views of Mount Washington and Black Butte to the northwest and the Deschutes River far below.

For more information call 541-408-4568 or visit Wheel Fun’s page on the Old Mill District website.

Wheel Fun Rentals

  • Open daily, 10 a.m. to sunset
  • Hourly, half-day, full-day and multi-day rentals available

THIS WAS ORIGINALLY AN ARTICLE TALKING ABOUT TAILGATING

NOW IT’S ABOUT SHOWING YOUR SPIRIT AND ENJOYING BACKYARD GAMES

By Carrie Ramoz

When I started writing this article, PAC-12 football was still an option. I had my remote control ready and my Saturdays blocked out for football. However, as I finish this article, PAC-12 football has been cancelled and most other conferences are making the same decision. 

Our fall sports are morphing from football in stadiums to cornhole tournaments in the driveway or Kan Jam in the backyard. Have fun, eat well, and show your spirit – we need it more than ever this year.

Just a quick stop while you’re in the Old Mill District will have you ready for any backyard family game day with: 

  1. Great snacks that are easy to prepare
  2. Crowd-pleasing main dishes delivered to your door
  3. All the colors! You can, and should, still show your team spirit
  4. Local brews

A super-simple way to enhance your spread of chips, vegetables and other finger foods is to include a variety of dips. Bend’s Savory Spice Shop dip variety pack includes 5 different options (Green Goddess, Horseradish Dill, Red Bell Ranch, Seven Onion and Tex Mex Queso). These dips just require a few simple mix-ins and you’re good to go for a day of versatile snacking. 

Be sure to show your spirit, even if the football games don’t happen this year! With more than 70 nail polish colors to choose from at Claire’s, it’s easy and fun to match your nails to your favorite team. Feeling bold? They also have a wide variety of colorful clip-in hair extensions and scrunchies in every possible color. Feeling really bold, men? Clip in extensions can easily be added to beards (email us a photo of colored extensions in your beard and we’ll send you a $10 Old Mill District gift card).

Prepping to enjoy a day of games should not involve hours in the kitchen, but a solid meal is important to potentially help absorb any adult beverages and to fuel your energy. Jimmy John’s can deliver anything from one sandwich to a platter that will serve 40 hungry fans. Sandwiches can be customized, and pickles can be delivered by the quart (yessssss!), and chips and cookies help round out this tasty, effortless option.

Grab a six-pack of beer or cider to top off your event. Local options at the Ticket Mill currently include Goodlife Brewing, Monkless Ales and Avid Cider. They keep their selections fresh and exciting, so check in to see if they have your favorite!

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AUTUMN EXCITEMENT

PUMPKIN SCARRING, COMFY TRENDS, SKIN CARE, AND HELPING OUR YOUNGEST PREPARE FOR SCHOOL

As the lush green of summer morphs into the golden autumn, there’s a certain excitement in the air. We caught up with a variety of businesses in Bend’s Old Mill District as they prepare for fall. Below are some trends, tips and ideas for the season. 

Comfy trends in back to school shopping

Back to school prep is a bit different this year, but just as important as always. Most schools in Central Oregon will begin the year with online learning. Rene Cass, manager at the Gap and GapKids in Bend, is seeing shoppers favor comfortable, casual wear. Cass reports that tie-dye is big, as is activewear, sweats and tees. GAP’s uniform collection is available solely online this year, but they do have a large variety of backpacks, jeans and long sleeve tops for autumn. 

Cass enjoys speaking with the shoppers, which often includes the parents and youth. 

“Most people are approaching this unique school year as an adventure. Setting students up for success looks different this fall, and they’re excited to shop for comfortable clothes and special little items to celebrate the new school year.”  

The excitement of a new school year for younger children

Embracing the new school year looks different for younger children. Elaine May, Owner and Director of the Deschutes River Montessori School, shares small steps that have large impacts on young students (ages 3-6) success. 

May’s favorite aspect of back to school time is the enthusiasm that comes with the start of a new school year, both among the teaching staff and the students. 

“There is a very real sense of freshness and new beginnings and an excitement and positive energy that can be felt in every interaction and conversation,” says May. 

  1. Read with your child, talk with your child, notice the world around you, together.
  2. Laugh, play, have conversations. Talk about protecting others’ feelings and being kind to one another. 
  3. Model and talk with your child about “using their words” to express their feelings.
  4. Let your child know it is okay to make mistakes, that adults make mistakes, too. Listen to music, dance, be silly. 
  5. Be serious. Be inquisitive. Be active. 
  6. Involve your child in daily activities: setting the table, cleaning the house, shopping for groceries, caring for pets, folding laundry. Allow your child to be independent rather than do all the little things for them.
  7. It is these life skills that help your child experience success at both school and life!

Scar your pumpkins for a unique look this fall

Looking for a unique and conversation-worthy way to decorate with pumpkins without needing to carve them? John Kish of plant shop Somewhere That’s Green highly recommends scarring pumpkins. This process requires a little more foresight than carving but is much less messy and super unique. 

It’s easy to grow one or two pumpkin vines, which should produce enough pumpkins to decorate any front porch. When the pumpkin is about the size of an apple, sketch out your design. Using a small, sharp blade, carve the design by puncturing the first layer of the pumpkin skin. Be careful to not dig too deep, which could cause the pumpkin to rot. 

Let the pumpkin air dry and the scar will appear as the plant grows. Kish says that rubbing ground cinnamon on the fresh cuts will keep bacteria at bay, but it’s not required. Try carving your name, address, an exciting announcement or spooky face. 

Easy steps for healthy skin as the seasons change

Sun, air conditioning, alcohol, and sweat all contribute to dull, dehydrated skin over the summer season. As we head into Fall, Central Oregon’s climate becomes even dryer. Tara Mortensen, Owner and Esthetician at Radiant Day Spa in Bend’s Old Mill District, often coaches clients through the simple steps to keep skin healthy. 

While you want to continue with your SPF, Mortensen encourages everyone to add in extra hydrating products as well. She also recommends:

  1. A clean oil cleanser (i.e. no mineral oil) is the best place to begin as home heating turns up. 
  2. To keep skin looking radiant, use an oil serum after your moisturizer by gently pressing it into the skin. This provides your skin an occlusive layer to seal in hydration while adding that double-bonus of a glowing complexion. 
  3. In addition to hydrating products, adding a humidifier to your bedroom can also help. 
  4. Brighten your complexion and lighten dark spots and/or radiation damage you may have acquired from the sun with Radiant’s level 2 peels and brightening serums.

“Fall is an excellent time to up your homecare routine as well as try one of our level 2 peels, which have some downtime, but also significant results,” says Mortensen. 

“All of Radiant Day Spa’s estheticians and massage therapists take great pride in going beyond clients’ expectations. Our technicians are very experienced, have magic in their hands and can release tension and stress in areas of the body a person didn’t know they were holding onto.”

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OUTDOOR COLOR & TEXTURE FOR EVERY SEASON

NEARLY 13,000 DAFFODIL AND ALLIUM BULBS ARE PLANTED EVERY FALL IN THE OLD MILL DISTRICT

Landscape in Central Oregon offers beauty and visual interest in every season. The vibrant purples and pinks of summer morph into golden hues and dusty greens as autumn approaches. The shiny red bark of Dogwood shrubs, the delicate Fall Crocus, and the late blooming Coreopsis replace the waving daisies and cheerful poppies in Bend’s Old Mill District. 

A well-planned garden will provide color, interest, texture and habitat year around. While most plants are their showiest in the early to mid-summer, some reach their full potential as the heat retreats. With landscaping that includes river and riparian areas, roundabouts, streetscapes, flowerpots, wild flower beds and cliffside beautification, Bend’s Old Mill District showcases creative foliage all four seasons. 

A gorgeous autumn landscape is possible and well worth the effort, says Nate O’Meara, Landscape Maintenance Manager/Designer with Millsite Landscape Services. O’Meara and his team provide services throughout the Old Mill District and Central Oregon.

O’Meara’s favorite flowering plants and pops of color for autumn include:

  • Flowers such as Autumn Joy, Fall Crocus, Aster and Coreopsis
  • Red/orange berries and fruit on trees and shrubs like Mount Ash trees and crabapples
  • Rose hips offer a robust orange color

He also encourages leaving seed heads on sunflowers and Black-eyed Susan plants. This provides seeds for birds and an interesting pop of texture in gardens.

Trees begin changing color toward the end of September. O’Meara likes to complement these colors through container plantings that will last through the winter, including:

  • fall annuals (Mums, Pansies/Violas) 
  • cold hardy evergreen perennials (Heather, Juniper, Kinnikinnick)  
  • center pieces (Dogwood, Holly)

Other tips: 

  • Remove all summer color in beds once frost kills the plants.
  • Plant bulbs later October for spring bloom. 
  • We plant about 13,000 daffodils and allium bulbs around the Old Mill District each year. 
  • Remove leaves from beds as they fall. 
  • Leave feather reed grasses for winter interest (cut them back in March). 
  • Cut Flowering perennials down to the ground as they go dormant
  • As grass growth slows, decrease the frequency of mowing.
  • Fertilize all turf. The fall fertilization is one of the most important as it stimulates root growth in the fall/ early winter so that the grass comes back strong in the spring.
  • Don’t fertilize shrubs/perennials so that they go dormant and harden off for winter.
  • Cross your fingers for snow to water the plants through the winter so there is no winter dehydration/death.

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A NEW NORMAL AT THE MOVIES

REGAL CINEMAS UP AND RUNNING UNDER NEW HEALTH GUIDELINES

The movies are back!

Regal Cinemas reopened nationwide last month with a wide range of new health and safety measures based on guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). So yes, you’ll be able to see Mulan, Tenet, The New Mutants and Black Widow on the big screen. 

Here’s the answers to some of the most frequently asked questions we’ve received about going back to the movies in the Old Mill District: 

Q: Do I have to wear a mask in the auditorium?

A: Yes, moviegoers will be required to wear face masks at all times while in the auditoriums. Masks can be removed inside the auditorium only while eating and drinking. Regal employees monitor auditoriums throughout each performance as standard practice. 

Q: How do I know Regal employees are safe?

A: Regal employees will undergo daily health screenings. Employees will be required to wash their hands at minimum every 30 to 60 minutes, depending on job role, and all employees will be required to wear masks.

Q: What are the new rules in the lobby?

A: Guests will be required to wear face masks at all times while in the lobby, hallways and restrooms. As per Regals’ terms of admission, any guest not complying with their policies shall be asked to leave. Guests will be welcome to return once they are compliant. Guests will also be encouraged to proceed to their auditorium as soon as possible, and exit the theatre in a timely manner at the conclusion of their movie.

Q: What will the concession stand be like?

A: Every other register will be closed and a reduced menu will be temporarily available. Self-service condiment stands will be closed and the bar area will remain open for walk-up service only.

Q Can I still get popcorn and soda refills?

A: No, unfortunately refills are not available.

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OLD MILL DISTRICT CELEBRATES 20 YEARS

BEND’S CULTURAL CENTER SPRANG FROM THE ASHES OF THE BROOKS-SCANLON AND SHEVLIN-HIXON SAWMILLS

Don’t underestimate the dreams of a night watchman. 

For two months in the summer of 1973, the omnipresent Brooks-Scanlon sawmills – the backbone of Bend’s economy for nearly eight decades – went quiet during a workers’ strike. Bill Smith, a young Brooks-Scanlon executive at the time, just three years removed from finishing his MBA at Stanford, was tasked with watching over the mill property at night.

While the mills normally churned 24 hours a day – Brooks-Scanlon had two different sites along the east side of the Deschutes River and owned the defunct Shevlin-Hixon site on the west side of the river – the property was downright tranquil during the labor dispute. And Smith, who took the Brooks-Scanlon job in large part because of Bend’s proximity to hunting grounds and fishing holes, couldn’t resist setting up a line in the Deschutes during his night watchman shift.

That’s where the vision of the Old Mill District was born.

“I sat on the banks of the river and thought, ‘This is a wonderful place’,” Smith says. “And it occurred to me, ‘Wouldn’t it be great if we could develop this?’”

Old Mill District developer Bill Smith

The Old Mill District celebrates 20 years this summer, with the heart of the district near that same spot on the Deschutes that Smith set up his trotline almost five decades ago. 

Following the short-lived lumber strike, Smith went back to the Brooks-Scanlon front office, eventually helping the company pivot into real estate before forming his own development business, William Smith Properties. Bend’s timber industry held out until 1993, when Crown Pacific sold off all the equipment from the last remaining mills of what had once been Brooks-Scanlon, demoing all but a handful of buildings on both sides of the river, leaving behind an industrial wasteland.

Smith, though, inspired by his moonlight fishing escape 20 years before, saw potential.

A William Smith Properties-led investment group bought 270 acres of former sawmill property from Crown Pacific and immediately began the area’s transformation. After “four years, 11 months and two days” of dealing with Oregon land use laws and city of Bend zoning issues – mixed-use zoning was entirely novel at the time – the project broke ground, and in 2000, Regal Cinemas and Ben & Jerry’s became the district’s first retail tenants. Others soon arrived, including some of our favorite spots to this day such as REI, Vanilla Urban Threads, Saxon’s Fine Jewelers, Greg’s Grill, and Tumalo Art Co

In keeping with the history of the location, Smith has restored and saved as many original sawmill buildings as possible. Nine original buildings still sit within the district, including the mill’s former powerhouse and its three iconic smokestacks. Additionally, plaques throughout the site mark areas of significant historical importance.

“If you’ve ever visited the River Walk in San Antonio, you’ll see something very similar to what I wanted to create here in Bend,” Smith says. “Now, in San Antonio it’s a concrete lined flood control ditch and it’s world renowned. … We’ve got the Deschutes River. With the Deschutes River, you can out-San Antonio San Antonio if you do it right. So that’s what we set out to do.” 

The renovation of the Brooks-Scanlon powerhouse building, which now houses REI.

Twenty years after Smith recruited Regal and Ben & Jerry’s to take a gamble on his “radical” mixed-use concept along the river, the Old Mill District has become one of the leading cultural hubs in the Pacific Northwest. The district has grown to include more than 55 local, regional and national businesses – an eclectic mix that includes restaurants, shops, art galleries, fitness studios, day spas, wine tasting rooms, a coffee shop and the gorgeous Les Schwab Amphitheater – and the three smokestacks atop the powerhouse building have become synonymous with Bend.

“The Old Mill District today has more people employed than both sawmills did at their peak, including all the ancillary people,” Smith says. “The Old Mill District is representative of what Bend’s become. Bend used to be a one-horse town.

“If you didn’t work for the sawmill or an aligned industry or somebody preying off the sawmill, you didn’t have a job,” he adds. “Now we have a much broader based economy. We’re less prone to struggling mightily if we only had one (major) employer.”

Smith’s vision of a dynamic dining/shopping/entertainment experience has helped Bend transition from a timber economy to one more focused on outdoor recreation. The creation of the Old Mill District opened up 14,000 linear feet of Deschutes River access that for the previous 80 years had been off limits to the public. Paved running and bike paths now parallel both sides of the river and are part of the 12-mile Deschutes River Trail that meanders through Bend. Numerous organized runs and walks make their way through the Old Mill District each year, and Bend’s iconic Pole Pedal Paddle multi-sport race finishes at the Amphitheater.

While shopping and dining options dominate the Old Mill District on the east side of the Deschutes, the west side of the river is anchored by one of the most scenic amphitheaters in the country. The state’s largest outdoor concert venue, the Les Schwab Amphitheater plays host to more than a dozen shows each summer, drawing acts as large as Paul Simon, Dave Matthews Band, Jack Johnson and Phish and as diverse as Jason Isbell, Alabama Shakes and The Roots. Approximately 8,000 fans can fit into the Amphitheater, which features an all-grass infield and spectacular views of the Cascade Range to the west.

Runners, cyclists and music lovers aren’t the only outdoor enthusiasts to take advantage of the Old Mill District’s charms. A small armada of floaters, kayakers and canoers can usually be found on the Deschutes during the summer and fall months as they make their way down to the new Bend Whitewater Park. And in particularly harsh winters, the area welcomes Nordic skiers and fat bikers.

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